Shakespeare Association of America
 

Upcoming Online Performances and Events

Shakespeare and Social Justice: From Principle to Action, A Roundtable Discussion


22 October 2021, 11:00 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. CDT

A conversation about the place of Shakespeare studies in addressing urgent issues of inclusion, fairness, diversity, and reparative justice in our current pedagogical practices, in our scholarship, and in our lives, featuring Adhar Noor Desai (Bard College), Hillary Eklund (Loyola University New Orleans), Wendy Beth Hyman (Oberlin College), Kirsten Mendoza (University of Dayton), David Ruiter (University of California, San Diego) and moderated by Julia Lupton (University of California, Irvine). Click here to register for the event.

Anti-Racist Syllabus Workshop


November 11, 11:00 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. CST

A hands-on workshop led by Carolyn Sandoval (Associate Director, Teaching + Learning Commons and Director of Engaged Teaching, University of California, San Diego). More information will be posted soon.

Shakespeare, Race and Performance: A Lecture by Professor Farah Karim-Cooper


19 October 2021, 6:00 p.m. BST

How do Shakespeare’s familiar plays Othello and Romeo and Juliet reflect the early modern preoccupation with race and emerging concepts of colour-based racism? How do these ideas play out in early modern as well as in contemporary performance?

Farah Karim-Cooper is Professor of Shakespeare Studies, King’s College London and Co -Director of Education & Research at Shakespeare’s Globe, where she has worked for the last 17 years. Farah is President of the Shakespeare Association of America after having served three years as Trustee.

She is on the Advisory Council for the Warburg Institute, the council of the Society for Renaissance Studies and is a newly-appointed Trustee of the Lyric Hammersmith.  She leads the architectural enquiries into early modern theatres at Shakespeare’s Globe, overseeing the research into the design and construction of the Sam Wanamaker Playhouse, the Globe’s indoor Jacobean theatre.

She has published over 40 chapters in books, reviews and articles and is a General Editor for Arden’s Shakespeare in the Theatre series and their Critical Intersections Series. She has written two books: Cosmetics in Shakespearean and Renaissance Drama (Edinburgh University Press, 2006, revised ed. 2019) and The Hand on the Shakespearean Stage: Gesture, Touch and the Spectacle of Dismemberment (Arden 2016). She has also co-edited Shakespeare’s Globe: A Theatrical Experiment with Christie Carson (Cambridge University Press, 2008); Shakespeare’s Theatres and the Effects of Performance with Tiffany Stern (Arden 2012) and Moving Shakespeare Indoors: Performance and Repertoire in the Jacobean Playhouse with Andrew Gurr (Cambridge University Press, 2014); she recently edited a collection for Arden, Titus Andronicus: The State of Play (2019) and has edited John Webster’s The Duchess of Malfi for the Routledge Anthology of Early Modern Drama, edited by Jeremy Lopez (2020). She is currently writing a book called, The Great White Bard: Shakespeare and Race Then and Now for OneWorld Publications.

In 2018 she curated the Globe’s first Shakespeare and Race Festival. She is an executive board member for RaceB4Race, a consortium of Scholars and institutions that seek racial justice in the field of pre-modern literary studies. In the UK she is creating the first ever Early Modern Scholars of Colour network.

Shakespeare, Race and Performance is sponsored by Gresham College.  For more information about this event, visit their website here.

Region and Enmity: A RaceB4Race Symposium


19-22 October 2021

Co-sponsored by Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey, the Folger Institute at the Folger Shakespeare Library, and the Arizona Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies at Arizona State University.

Enmity is a sustaining force for systemic racism, a fervent antipathy toward a category of people. Enmity exists at the nexus of individual and group identity and produces difference by desiring opposition and supremacy, imagining separation by force, and willing conflict. Enmity unfolds in different ways in different places, according to local logics of territory, population, language, or culture, even as these geographical divisions are subject to constant change.

This interdisciplinary symposium, hosted by Rutgers University, focuses on how early modern racial discourses are tied to cartographical markers and ambitions. The notions of enmity and region provide a dual dynamic lens for tracing the racial repertoires that developed in response to increasingly hostile contention between early modern cultural and political forces. The symposium will invite scholars to take up this intersection between region and enmity, and to examine how belief in difference, or the emergence of polarizing structures and violent practices, configured race thinking and racial practices in ways that are both unique to different territories and that transcend them.

RaceB4Race is brought to life by the Arizona Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies in partnership with The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences Division of Humanities at Arizona State University. RaceB4Race is underwritten by the Hitz Foundation.

Learn more about RaceB4Race hereRegistration opens August 16, 2021 at 9:00 am EDT.

Open-Access Recordings, Articles, and Podcasts

  • Digital Theatre+ and the Asian Shakespeare Association hosted a webinar exploring some of the ways the study of Shakespeare has become increasingly accessible through digital resources and online delivery to students around the world, which is now available to view on YouTube
  • For all past performances from The Show Must Go Online, visit their website.

  • Listen to Pascale Aebischer, author of Shakespeare, Spectatorship and the Technologies of Performance,  and Sonia Massai, author of Shakespeare’s Accents: Voicing Identity in Performance, discuss their work with friends, colleagues and well-wishers. Access the recording, from the Society for Renaissance Studies, here

  • Lord Denney’s Players’ production of Much Ado About Nothing was originally scheduled to run March 26-29, 2020 in the Ohio Union, but the state’s “stay-at-home” order prevented the live show from occurring. Fortunately, ASCTech and LDP’s signature innovation saved the day: Much Ado’s surveillance culture readily translated to a film built using the same social meeting software that has enabled OSU to move its educational mission entirely online. Watch it online here.

  • Episode 22 of the podcast Ministry of Ideas, “Stealing the Cannons,” explores how Shakespeare came to occupy his central place in the canon, why some people have challenged the traditional canon, and how artists like Shakespeare and Hamilton’s Lin-Manuel Miranda use canons to inspire creativity, create community, and even foster democracy. It features original interviews with Rory Loughnane, an associate editor of the New Oxford Shakespeare; John Ray Proctor, an actor and professor of drama at Tulane University; Stephen Greenblatt, editor of the Norton Shakespeare; and Oskar Eustis, artistic director at the Public Theater. Click here to read more or listen to the episode online or listen on Spotify, Apple podcasts, or Lyceum.

  • Inspired by this creativity, courage, and beauty amid isolation and fear of The Decameron by Italian poet Giovanni Boccaccio, Tennessee Shakespeare Company organized their own Decameron Project — a Facebook Live effort in which our artists bring you classical pieces, inspirational poetry, short performances from Shakespeare, and brief looks at this day in the history of cultural arts and significant events, all of a theme as outlined by Aristotle’s twelve virtues. Watch all past episodes online here.

  • Every Friday through Christmas, Cal Shakes will release a new ten-minute weekly video lecture series with Resident Dramaturg Philippa Kelly who will be “running the canon.” Covering every single one of Shakespeare’s 37 plays over 37 weeks, Kelly will bring the same breadth and insight that she does to her famous pre-show Grove Talks. Watch all the talks online

  • Visit the Folger Shakespeare Library website for a full list of their digital experiences and resources. 

  • Listen to The Musicians in Ordinary Podcast, which explores the historical and cultural context of music of the Renaissance at home, in court, in Shakespeare’s theatre and beyond. In the March 13 episode, Prof. Tom Bishop (Univ. of Auckland) talks about Shakespeare’s Pericles. Prof. Linda Austern (Northwestern U.) talks about music and medicine in the 17th century, and Felix Deak plays Deth by Tobias Hume. Listen on PodBay or Apple Podcasts.

  • Watch archived episodes of Bard Talks by the Shakespeare Center of Los Angeles online here. Led by distinguished scholars from universities, libraries and institutes across the globe, Bard Talks examine Elizabethan society, production and rehearsal, Shakespeare’s timeless themes, and classic characters.

  • Mark Beauchamp performs Prospero’s speech during COVID-19 on lockdown in the U.K. Watch on YouTube.

  • Read SAA member Scott Newstok’s wonderful essays “Lorraine Hansberry on Shakespeare” on LinkedIn.com here and “We would all do well to think more like Shakespeare” on The Dallas Daily News here.

  • Women & Shakespeare Podcast features conversations with diverse women directors, actors, writers, and academics who are involved in making and interpreting Shakespeare. The series is designed to harness digital humanities to redress the gender and racial disparity in academic citational practices, public discourse, and rehearsal room power dynamics in the field of Shakespeare studies and performance. Funded by NYU (New York University), Series 1 of the ‘Women and Shakespeare’ podcast includes guests ranging from the renowned actors Dona Croll, Kathy Pogson, and Janet Suzman to Orwell prize-winning author, Dr Delia Jarett Macauley to Head of Higher Education and Research at Shakespeare’s Globe and Vice-President of the Shakespeare Association of America, Professor Farah Karim-Cooper, to multiple award-winning playwright Chris Bush. Listen on Apple Podcasts, Spotify or on their website.

  • Watch “Look Another Way,” a conversation with authors and professors Scott Newstok, James Shapiro and Emma Smith moderated by Jeffrey Horowitz, Founding Artistic Director of Theatre for a New Audience. Watch on YouTube here.

  • David Keys explores the history of London’s first theatre in a new article for the Independent. Read it online here

 
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