Shakespeare Association of America
 

Upcoming Conferences and Other Events

The 2022 National Humanities Conference Call for Proposals is Now Available!

 

November 10-13, 2022

 

We are pleased to announce that the Call for Proposals for the 2022 National Humanities Conference is now available! The conference will be held November 10-13 in Los Angeles, California.

 

Co-hosted by the National Humanities Alliance and the Federation of State Humanities Councils, the National Humanities Conference brings together representatives from colleges, universities, state humanities councils, cultural institutions, and other community-based organizations to explore approaches to deepening the public’s engagement with the humanities.

 

This year’s theme is “Energy of Motion: Experiencing Change in Kinetic California.” After many months of being in stasis because of the global pandemic, we are all craving movement, travel, activity—and Los Angeles is the perfect place to experience this, to accelerate our connections and create greater humanities energy together. The conference is an opportunity to envision how the humanities contribute to understanding movement and the energy that results, as well as how the humanities themselves generate kinetic energy that transforms individual and collective lives. 

 

We encourage you to submit proposals and recruit others to do the same! Please contact Edward Moreno at events@statehumanities.org with any questions or for support in building sessions.

 

 

Brandeis University Mandel Center for the Humanities panel: “What is Public Scholarship?”

 

May 13 & 14, 2022

 

This conference aims to address vexed questions of relevance and contemporary significance in relation to Shakespeare and to engage with the complex contiguity between the hot-button issues of our own day and their Shakespearean resonances.  Presenters will ask not just why or how Shakespeare might be pertinent to current social, political, and literary matters, but also relevant to whom? How do we make connections between Shakespeare and the myriad of current issues around race, ethnicity, sexual and gender identity, or the environment without conflating discrete temporal moments?  When and why might it be important for scholars to resist the pressures of relevance? Addressing these questions from a range of perspectives, including performance, text, history, and poetics, will variously sharpen, counter, and contradict some of the arguments that are regularly made in defense of the humanities.

 

Learn more about Shakespeare and the Poetics and Politics of Relevance here or contact Dympna C. Callaghan, Syracuse University (dccallag@syr.edu).

 

 

Shakespeare and the Poetics and Politics of Relevance

 

May 13 & 14, 2022

 

This conference aims to address vexed questions of relevance and contemporary significance in relation to Shakespeare and to engage with the complex contiguity between the hot-button issues of our own day and their Shakespearean resonances.  Presenters will ask not just why or how Shakespeare might be pertinent to current social, political, and literary matters, but also relevant to whom? How do we make connections between Shakespeare and the myriad of current issues around race, ethnicity, sexual and gender identity, or the environment without conflating discrete temporal moments?  When and why might it be important for scholars to resist the pressures of relevance? Addressing these questions from a range of perspectives, including performance, text, history, and poetics, will variously sharpen, counter, and contradict some of the arguments that are regularly made in defense of the humanities.

 

Learn more about Shakespeare and the Poetics and Politics of Relevance here or contact Dympna C. Callaghan, Syracuse University (dccallag@syr.edu).

 

 

Region and Enmity: A RaceB4Race Symposium

 

October 19-22, 2021

 

Co-sponsored by Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey, the Folger Institute at the Folger Shakespeare Library, and the Arizona Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies at Arizona State University.

 

Enmity is a sustaining force for systemic racism, a fervent antipathy toward a category of people. Enmity exists at the nexus of individual and group identity and produces difference by desiring opposition and supremacy, imagining separation by force, and willing conflict. Enmity unfolds in different ways in different places, according to local logics of territory, population, language, or culture, even as these geographical divisions are subject to constant change.

 

This interdisciplinary symposium, hosted by Rutgers University, focuses on how early modern racial discourses are tied to cartographical markers and ambitions. The notions of enmity and region provide a dual dynamic lens for tracing the racial repertoires that developed in response to increasingly hostile contention between early modern cultural and political forces. The symposium will invite scholars to take up this intersection between region and enmity, and to examine how belief in difference, or the emergence of polarizing structures and violent practices, configured race thinking and racial practices in ways that are both unique to different territories and that transcend them.

 

RaceB4Race is brought to life by the Arizona Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies in partnership with The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences Division of Humanities at Arizona State University. RaceB4Race is underwritten by the Hitz Foundation.

 

Learn more about RaceB4Race here. Registration opens August 16, 2021 at 9:00 am EDT.

 
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